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Quotes from John Jay

Quotes that appear on this page are taken from two sources. The first, and lesser known, is an open letter entitled Address to the People of Great Britain, published almost two years before the start of the American Revolution. Though signed by several committee members, this piece was reportedly penned by Jay. The second source, which is very well known in jury nullification circles, is the instructions Jay issued to the jury in the trial of Georgia v. Brailsford (1794).

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Quotes are presented in a variety of formats for your convenience. You can copy and paste the text versions on the web page. FIJA uses the 1024 x 512 pixel graphics on Twitter, and the 400 x 400 pixel graphics on Facebook and our website. You may also find use on other social media or elsewhere for the 800 x 800 pixel graphics.

 

William Penn Quotes

These quotes are taken from the account written up after the famous 1670 trial of William Penn and William Mead, who were being prosecuted for supposedly causing a tumult by preaching the Quaker religion in Gracechurch Street in London.

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"What hope is there of ever having justice done, when Juries are threatened, and their Verdicts rejected?... Unhappy are those Juries, who are threatened to be fined, and starved, and ruined, if they give not in Verdicts contrary to their Consciences."
—William Penn, The Tryal of William Penn and William Mead, 1670

"The Agreement of Twelve Men is a Verdict in Law, and such a one being given by the Jury, I require the Clerk of the Peace to record it, as he will answer it at his Peril. And if the Jury bring in another Verdict contradictory to this, I affirm they are perjur'd Men in Law. [And looking upon the Jury] You are Englishmen, mind your Privilege, give not away your Right."
—William Penn, The Tryal of William Penn and William Mead, 1670

"If Not guilty be not a Verdict, then you make of the Jury and Magna Charta but a meer Nose of Wax."
—William Penn, The Tryal of William Penn and William Mead, 1670

 

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John Howel Quotes

This quote is taken from the account written up after the famous 1670 trial of William Penn and William Mead, who were being prosecuted for supposedly causing a tumult by preaching the Quaker religion in Gracechurch Street in London.

READ THE QUOTE IN CONTEXT >

 

Text version for copy and paste:

"Gentlemen, You shall not be dismist till we have a Verdict, that the Court will accept; and you shall be lockt up, without Meat, Drink, Fire, and Tobacco; you shall not think thus to abuse the Court, we will have a Verdict, by the help of God, or you shall starve for it."
—John Howel, one of the judges on the bench in The Tryal of William Penn and William Mead, 1670

 

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John Vaughan Quotes

Coming soon!