Fully Informed Jury Association

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Archive for the Tag 'Edward Snowden'

Function of Juries &Jury Nullification | 30 May 2014

-Edward Snowden Has the Right to the Benefits of Trial by Jury. Period.

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Earlier this week, NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden sat for an extensive interview, filmed in Moscow, Russia, with NBC’s Brian Williams. Here is the first of six parts: The full interview is available here. Depressingly, yesterday I encountered two different people in totally different contexts on social media who advocated that Snowden be murdered. Not tried, […]

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Jury Nullification | 16 Jul 2013

-Former State Department Lawyer and Cartoonist Speculate on Jury Nullification for Snowden

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Jury nullification makes The Atlantic today, with regard to the Edward Snowden case. Conor Friedersdorf shares the comments of both David Pozen, a Columbia Law School professor and former State Department lawyer, and cartoonist Scott Adams in this article. Would an American Jury Even Convict Edward Snowden? At Lawfare, David Pozen, a Columbia Law School […]

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Jury Nullification | 05 Jul 2013

-Dilbert Creator Scott Adams Predicts Jury Nullification for Snowden

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Dilbert creator Scott Adams recently expressed his skepticism that any jury could be found who would convict Edward Snowden for alleged legal violations related to disclosing criminal activity by the NSA. Adams, unclear on the legal status of his right to speak his mind openly on the topic of jury nullification, does not officially advocate […]

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Function of Juries &Jury Nullification | 11 Jun 2013

-Jury Nullification, Not a Pardon for Edward Snowden

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Thomas Mullen discusses the case of Edward Snowden, the whistleblower who publicly acknowledges exposing the NSA’s unconstitutional domestic spying program collecting private communications from U.S. citizens who aren’t even suspected of wrongdoing. In light of government efforts to prosecute Snowden, a petition has been started asking for a pardon. Mullen argues that this should not […]

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