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Function of Juries & Jury Nullification | 06 Mar 2014

-Incarcerated Man Shares Insights with Jurors

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Fence_of_Prison-BPOThis letter from Ray Jasper, scheduled to be executed on March 19, is a part of a series entitled Letters from Death Row. Here we excerpt a short passage that is particularly informative for jurors, who should be aware as they deliberate the fate of a person accused of a crime the seriousness and severity of the punishment their Guilty verdict may help inflict on that person. In a world where we have thousands of people serving life without parole for non-violent—and sometimes entirely victimless—offenses, where we have a woman facing a mandatory minimum of 60 years for actions that did not harm another human being, jurors need to be skeptical of delivering Guilty verdicts to which they are led by a punitive system tilted in favor of prosecution for profit.

A Letter From Ray Jasper, Who Is About to Be Executed

Under the 13th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution all prisoners in America are considered slaves. We look at slavery like its a thing of the past, but you can go to any penitentiary in this nation and you will see slavery. That was the reason for the protests by prisoners in Georgia in 2010. They said they were tired of being treated like slaves. People need to know that when they sit on trial juries and sentence people to prison time that they are sentencing them to slavery.

If a prisoner refuses to work and be a slave, they will do their time in isolation as a punishment. You have thousands of people with a lot of prison time that have no choice but to make money for the government or live in isolation. The affects of prison isolation literally drive people crazy. Who can be isolated from human contact and not lose their mind? That was the reason California had an uproar last year behind Pelican Bay. 33,000 inmates across California protested refusing to work or refusing to eat on hunger-strikes because of those being tortured in isolation in Pelican Bay.

I think prison sentences have gotten way out of hand. People are getting life sentences for aggravated crimes where no violence had occurred. I know a man who was 24 years old and received 160 years in prison for two aggravated robberies where less that $500 was stole and no violence took place. There are guys walking around with 200 year sentences and they’re not even 30 years old. Its outrageous. Giving a first time felon a sentence beyond their life span is pure oppression. Multitudes of young people have been thrown away in this generation.

The other side of the coin is there are those in the corporate world making money off prisoners, so the longer they’re in prison, the more money is being made. It’s not about crime & punishment, it’s about crime & profit. Prison is a billion dollar industry. In 1996, there were 122 prisons opened across America. Companies were holding expos in small towns showing how more prisons would boost the economy by providing more jobs.

How can those that invest in prisons make money if people have sentences that will allow them to return to free society? If people were being rehabilitated and sent back into the cities, who would work for these corporations? That would be a bad investment. In order for them to make money, people have to stay in prison and keep working. So the political move is to tell the people they’re tough on crime and give people longer sentences.

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