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Jury Nullification | 24 May 2013

-Gun Control Law Sparks Protest Outside New York Capitol

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Jury nullification makes a prominent appearance in the public discourse again this week in the state of New York, where activists are continuing to protest the state’s so-called “SAFE Act”. The act created numerous additional victimless violations and increased sentences for other victimless violations. While activists are working to amend or repeal the measure, Rob Arrigo of the Campaign for Liberty pointed out at the rally that jurors need not be complicit in enforcing the law against peaceful people who have harmed nobody. Jurors can protect individuals’ Second Amendment rights by voting Not Guilty.

Gun control law sparks protest outside Capitol

Opponents of the SAFE gun control act gathered on the east steps of the state Capitol on Tuesday to denounce Gov. Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders, and to press for the law’s full repeal.

Hosted by the NY2A Grassroots Coalition, the rally attracted about 400 participants at its peak. Speakers included the repeal measure’s legislative sponsor, Hudson Valley Republican Assemblyman Steve Katz, as well as Richard Mack, a former Arizona county sheriff prominent in conservative circles.

Other speakers advised the crowd not to register their weapons and counseled them on the importance of “jury nullification” when faced with a law one deems to be unconstitutional.

Third anti-SAFE Act rally held in Capitol park

Rob Arrigo, Saratoga County coordinator for Campaign for Liberty, told supporters there were two words to nullify the SAFE Act in the courts – “Not guilty.”

“The principle of jury nullification is simple. It is the duty of the independent juror to judge not only the guilt of the defendant in the law,” Arrigo explained to activists. “But also to judge the law itself.”

Arrigo, like his supporters, says the SAFE Act is unconstitutional and jurors can find those charged under the law not guilty based on that premise.

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